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My Talk about Automated Jasmine 2.x tests in GeeCON

July 29, 2015 in JavaScript

Finally, my Talk about Automated Jasmine 2.x tests in GeeCON Poland is now published, I hope that you will find it useful.

“JavaScript Mobile Application Development” book is published

October 27, 2014 in Apache Cordova, JavaScript, jQuery Mobile

I’m pleased to announce the release of my new Book “JavaScript Mobile Application Development” using Apache Cordova:
http://www.amazon.com/JavaScript-Native-Mobile-Apps-Development/dp/1783554177

Book Cover

What this book is about

Mobile development is one of the hottest trends and a staple in today’s software industry. Almost every popular website today has its own equivalent mobile application version to allow its current users to access its functions from a mobile device. However, developing mobile applications requires a lot of effort and a wide skill set from mobile developers. Whether you are developing a mobile app for an iPad or on a Windows Phone, there is a requirement to learn the specific languages and technologies for that device. This is where the glory of Apache Cordova shines. As a set of device APIs for building cross-platform mobile applications using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, the apps developed using JavaScript APIs are easily portable to other device platforms, as well as being consistent across devices and built on web standards. As a result of this, you will find that your development costs and efforts are sharply reduced, whilst increasing the readability and maintainability of your code, as you make use of only one popular programming language: JavaScript.

This is the learning resource to use when you want to efficiently develop your own native mobile applications using Apache Cordorva as the platform that uses HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. In order to develop neat-looking mobile applications, this book also utilizes jQuery mobile. jQuery mobile is one of the best mobile web application frameworks that allows web developers to develop web applications that are mobile friendly.

We start by developing a simple sound recorder mobile app. We then configure this app to work on Android, Windows, and iOS. Then you will learn how to use the different APIs provided by Apache Cordova and how to develop your Apache Cordova custom plugins.

You will then learn how to develop, run, and automate tests using Jasmine. At the end, you develop a “Mega App” where you will learn in details how to design, develop, and deploy a real cross-platform Apache Cordova application that works in Android, iOS, and Windows Phone 8.

After finishing this book, you should be able to develop your mobile application on the different mobile platforms, using only JavaScript, without having to learn the native programming languages of every mobile platform.

What this book covers

Chapter 1, An Introduction to Apache Cordova, teaches what Apache Cordova is and the differences between mobile web, mobile hybrid, and mobile native applications. You will also know why we should use Apache Cordova, along with the current Apache Cordova architecture, and finally, the chapter offers an overview of Apache Cordova APIs.

Chapter 2, Developing Your First Cordova Application, explains how to develop, build, and deploy your first Sound Recorder mobile application on the Android platform.

Chapter 3, Apache Cordova Development Tools, explains how to configure your Android, iOS, and Windows Phone development environments. You will also learn how to support and run your Sound Recorder mobile application on both iOS and Windows Phone 8 platforms.

Chapter 4, Cordova API in Action, dives deep into Apache Cordova API, and you will see it in action. You will learn how to work with the Cordova accelerometer, camera, compass, connection, contacts, device, Geolocation, globalization, and InAppBrowser API by exploring the code of the Cordova Exhibition app. The Cordova Exhibition app is designed and developed to show complete usage examples of the Apache Cordova core plugins. The Cordova Exhibition app supports Android, iOS, and Windows Phone 8.

Chapter 5, Diving Deeper into the Cordova API, continues to dive into Apache Cordova API by exploring the remaining main features of the Cordova Exhibition app. You will learn how to work with Cordova media, file, capture, notification, and storage API. You will also learn how to utilize the Apache Cordova events in your Cordova mobile app.

Chapter 6, Developing Custom Cordova Plugins, dives deep into Apache Cordova and lets you create your own custom Apache Cordova plugin on the three most popular mobile platforms: Android, which uses the Java programming language, iOS, which uses the Objective-C programming language, and Windows Phone 8, which uses the C# programming language.

Chapter 7, Unit Testing Cordova Apps Logic, explains how to develop JavaScript unit tests for your Cordova app logic. You will learn the basics of the Jasmine JavaScript unit testing framework and understand how to use Jasmine in order to test both the synchronous and asynchronous JavaScript code. You will learn how to utilize Karma as a powerful JavaScript test runner in order to automate the running of your developed Jasmine tests. You will also learn how to generate the test and code coverage reports from your developed tests. Finally, you will learn how to fully automate your JavaScript tests by integrating your developed tests with Continuous Integration tools.

Chapter 8, Applying it All – the Mega Application, explores how to design and develop a complete app (Mega App) using Apache Cordova and jQuery Mobile API. Mega App is a memo utility that allows users to create, save, and view audible and visual memos on the three most popular mobile platforms (Android, iOS, and Windows Phone 8). In order to create this utility, Mega App uses jQuery Mobile to build the user interface and Apache Cordova to access the device information, camera, audio (microphone and speaker), and filesystem. In this chapter, you will learn how to create a portable app that respects the differences between Android, iOS, and Windows Phone 8.

Where to buy this book

You can buy JavaScript Mobile Application Development Book from:

Back from GeeCON Poland 2014

May 25, 2014 in Conference, Continuous Integration, Jasmine, JavaScript, Unit Testing

Main

I just get back from GeeCON that was held in Krakow, Poland 14-16 May 2014. The conference organization was fantastic and there were a lot of attendees in the conference sessions. IMO, GeeCON is really the biggest Java Conferences in the Central-Eastern Europe as it had 1100+ attendees.

Big_Session

I had the chance to present “Jasmine Automated Tests for JavaScript” in 15 May, the session had many attendees and I was really amazed by the energy, enthusiasm, and responsiveness of the attendees during the session.

1

3

The session went great and I was glad to give a free copy of my JavaScript Unit Testing book to one of the attendees who answered a JavaScript quiz at the end of my session.
IMG_6801

I uploaded my session below:

Finally, I would like to thank all the organizers of this conference, especially Adrian Nowak (@adrno), Adam Dudczak (@maneo), Marcin Gadamer (@marcingadamer), and certainly all of the wonderful guys behind this conference.

[OT] Krakow is a wonderful modern city, if you plan to go there then do not miss visiting Ojców Garden Krakow, Wawel Royal Castle, and generally Old Krakow city. I attached below some of the photos below:

1. Krakow, The Old City, 16 March 2014:
https://plus.google.com/photos/105100477384124159138/albums/6014103071265602913

2. Wawel Royal Castle, Krakow, 16 May 2014:
https://plus.google.com/photos/105100477384124159138/albums/6014128282375540177

Speaking in Geecon 2014

February 24, 2014 in Conference, JavaScript

Geecon
I will be speaking in Geecon conference (From 14 May to 16 May @Krakow, Poland) about “Jasmine Automated Tests for JavaScript”. My session will be a practical one, I will discuss how to develop unit tests for the JavaScript code of the applications using Jasmine as a powerful descriptive JavaScript unit testing tool and how to “automate” running Jasmine tests on the web browsers. The session also discusses how to generate Jasmine reports from the build management tools:
http://2014.geecon.org/speakers/hazem-saleh

Personally, it is my first time to visit Poland, beside enjoying technical stuff, I would like to visit some tourist places there, any suggestions are welcome 🙂 ?

I really wish to see all of you there in Geecon Poland 2014!

What the JavaScript Unit Testing book covers?

January 23, 2013 in Ajax, Book, Jasmine, JavaScript, JsTestDriver, QUnit, Unit Testing, YUITest


The JavaScript Unit Testing book is a comprehensive practical guide that illustrates in details how to efficiently perform and automate JavaScript testing for web applications using the most popular JavaScript unit testing frameworks.

The book starts by explaining the concept of JavaScript unit testing and by exploring the bits of an interactive Ajax web application. Throughout the book chapters, the JavaScript part of the web application is tested using popular JavaScript unit testing frameworks (Jasmine, YUITest, QUnit, and JsTestDriver). The book illustrates how to generate JavaScript test reports, how to automate running the tests in the build and the continuous integration environments, and how to make all of the mentioned JavaScript unit testing frameworks work together in order to test the web applications in the most efficient way.

After reading this book, you will learn everything you need to know in order to make efficient JavaScript tests for the web applications. You will learn how to generate test and code coverage reports, how to automate running the JavaScript tests, and the bits of the JavaScript testing by following the book practical hands-on detailed examples.

You can order the book from: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1782160620/.

Finally, I would like to thank all of the persons that worked with me in order to produce this book (Acquisition Editor, Commissioning Editors, Technical Editors, Copy Editors, Project Coordinator, Proofreaders, Graphics Designers, Production Coordinator) and certainly the technical reviewer of this book Allan Lykke Christensen.

Running Jasmine on the top of the JsTestDriver test runner

April 8, 2012 in JavaScript, JsTestDriver, Unit Testing

In the previous post, I give you a kickstart about the Jasmine JavaScript unit testing framework. In this post, I will show you how to integrate the Jasmine framework with the JsTestDriver. You will combine the best of them, the power of Jasmine pretty syntax and the power of JSTD test runner.

The JsTestDriver is not only a JavaScript unit testing framework but it is also a test runner that can host other JavaScript unit testing frameworks through adapters. The JsTestDriver can host the following JS unit testing frameworks and more:
1. QUnit.
2. Jasmine.
3. YUI UI Test.

First of all to be able to run Jasmine on the top of the JsTestDriver runner, you need to download the Jasmine JSTD adapter from here: https://github.com/ibolmo/jasmine-jstd-adapter.

In order to run Jasmine test suites on the top of JSTD test runner, you need to load the adapter and the source files before the test files as follows in the jsTestDriver.conf file:

server: http://localhost:9876

load:
  - jasmine/lib/jasmine-1.1.0/jasmine.js
  - jasmine/lib/adapter/JasmineAdapter.js  
  - js-src/Basics.js
  - js-test/BasicsSpec.js 

After that you can start the JSTD server, and then run the test cases as usual. I attached below the screenshot of the Jasmine tests on the top of the JSTD test runner.
jstd jasmine screenshot

I attached here the project source for your reference.

Testing JavaScript code using Jasmine (Kickstart)

April 7, 2012 in JavaScript, Unit Testing, Web 2.0

Jasmine is one of the JavaScript unit testing frameworks. It has a nice advantage that its syntax is readable and a very human friendly. In this post, I will give you a kickstart to help you start working with Jasmine.

First of all, Let’s create a simple JavaScript object that we need to perform some unit testing on it:

/* Basics.js file */
function Basics() {
}

Basics.prototype.add = function(x, y) {
	return x + y;
};

As shown in the Basics.js file, Basics is a simple JavaScript object that contains one method that adds the x and y parameters and finally returns the result to the caller.

To start working with the Jasmine framework, download the framework from http://pivotal.github.com/jasmine/download.html. Make sure that you have the following folder structure after extracting the downloaded zip file:
jasmine structure

You are having three folders and one html file.
1. lib folder: contains the source files of the Jasmine framework.
2. src folder: contains the source JavaScript files that will be tested.
3. spec folder: contains the testing JavaScript files.
4. SpecRunner.html file: is used for running the JavaScript test suites.

Place the Basics.js in the src folder after making sure that you remove all the old contents of the src and the spec folders.

Now, Let’s write the test suite in the BasicsSpec.js file.

describe("Basics", function() {
  var basics = new Basics();  

  it("should be able to make correct addition", function() {
    expect(basics.add(3, 2)).toEqual(5);
  });

});

As we see here, the testing syntax is very human friendly, it means “describe Basics object which should be able to make correct addition”. The describe keyword represents a test suite that can contain one or more specs. Every spec is represented by the it keyword.

Inside the spec, there is an expectation that expects the basics.add(3, 2) is equal to 5. In Jasmine, the expectation is represented by the expect keyword and the equality checking is represented by a matcher called toEquals.

In Jasmine, there are many other built-in matchers; you can find all of them here: https://github.com/pivotal/jasmine/wiki/Matchers.

Finally, do not forget to remove the old source and spec JS includes from the SpecRunner.html and to add the new includes instead:

  <!-- include source files here... -->
  <script type="text/javascript" src="src/Basics.js"></script>  
  
  <!-- include spec files here... -->
  <script type="text/javascript" src="spec/BasicsSpec.js"></script>

After running the SpecRunner.html file, you will find the following screenshot telling you that the test spec runs successfully.

screenshot

I wish this kickstart can be useful for you. For your reference, download the kickstart example from here.

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